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maple

Maple teriyaki marinade for chicken and pork

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Ingredients

125 ml Maple syrup
15 ml (1 TBSP) Dijon mustard
2 fresh cloves of garlic (1 tsp) crushed
250 ml Soy sauce
10 ml (2 TSP) chopped fresh ginger
150 ml (10 TBSP) red wine or port

DIRECTIONS
Whisk together all ingredients
Let chicken or pork marinate for at least 4 hours in the refrigerator
Grill or pan fry

Lentil soup with a hint of maple syrup

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Creator of quality designs and thinker of fresh ideas.

1 tablespoon coconut oil or ghee
2 large onions
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
Fine sea salt
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste
1 (15-ounce / 400g) can whole tomatoes
200g red lentils, picked over and rinsed very well (soaked, if possible)
1 litre water
.5 litre coconut milk
1 bay leaf
1tbsp maple vinegar
3 tbsp pure maple syrup
Fresh cilantro leaves or flat-leaf parsley leaves
Cayenne pepper

METHOD
1. Heat a pot to medium and add the garlic, onions and ginger until browned. Add the salt and cumin.
2. Add the canned tomatoes, water, bay leaves and lentils and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes or until lentils are tender.
(it helps if you soak them for a couple of hours beforehand)
3. Add the maple syrup and maple vinegar.
4. Remove the bay leaves and blend with a hand mixer until smooth.
5. Add more water to desired consistency and add some coconut milk for added creaminess

Top with cayenne pepper and the fresh herbs.
Enjoy!

Maple vinegar – not just for salads

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Just a dash of maple vinegar will enhance any dish - and in a healthy way.

Vinegar is usually something we think of as a simple ingredient for salads and pickling. But, as only the best chefs know, sour foods like lemon and vinegar (along with salt) are the essential flavour enhancers of gastronomy. Even the word vinegar is from French, meaning "vin-aigre" meaning Old French vyn egre, which in turn derives from Latin vinum (wine) + acer (sour). And, in the past as today, the name was used for grapes that were made into wine and then soured after having been opened.

Maple vinegar brought to Norway by Maple Tree is a totally unique product and combines the elements we love from balsamic with a maple twist. Flavours in maple vinegar are never too robust nor is the texture too thick, and can, therefore, be used as a light dressing, in pan sauces, directly on apples or drizzled on ripe cheeses or on a pannacotta. Because of its viscose texture, it can still be used in a simple green salad with great olive oil or walnut oil. Walnuts and maple are always ingredients that go together. Or, dunk some fresh bread into this vinegar mixed with a high-quality olive oil. Or, try them in a martini or switchel - the classic New England farmhouse drink. I have also tried eating them frying cherry tomatoes in butter and maple vinegar!

Many more recipes coming soon for this fantastic new addition to the Maple Tree and to your pantry!

Maple glazed sucuk

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Add a sweet note to this savoury Turkish sausage with a glaze of pure maple syrup.

Ingredients
1 sucuk, sliced in 2cm thick pieces
3 tablespoons maple syrup

How to
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. On a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet, arrange sucuk in a single layer. Bake until fat is rendered and sucuk is beginning to brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Carefully remove from oven and brush with pure maple syrup. Bake until sucuk is browned and sticky, 3 to 5 minutes. With tongs, transfer to a wire rack, then set rack on baking sheet and let sucuk drain. Serve warm.

NOTES
Rather than frying on the stove-top, sucuk cooks easily in the oven. Is delicious with fried eggs.